(304) 257-1844

By Ravenna Redman

Director of Social Services

The employees of Grant Rehabilitation and Care Center have chosen Betty J. Smith as their GRCC Resident of the Week. Betty has been a resident of our facility since January 4, 2023.

Betty was born on April 9, 1946, to Louis and Lucy (Caperton) Noble in Arlington Va. Betty has three siblings, two sisters, Jeanette, and Joyce who have passed, a brother, Bobby Noble, and a half sister, Annette.

Betty reported that her father, Louis laid tile and flooring, and that her mother stayed at home, taking care of the children. She stated that she lived on a farm. She and her siblings would play in the creek and climb trees.

She reported that she had a good childhood. She stated that she attended Fairfax County Schools. Betty reported that she really didn’t care for school, so she quit after completing eighth grade.

When Betty was nine years old, her mother Lucy passed away due to heart problems. Her father Louis remarried to Edna Burdette, who became Betty’s stepmother, and they had Annette.

Her stepmother would introduce her to Heiskell Ray Smith. Betty reported that they would date for six to eight months, and then they would marry on June 1, 1963. Betty described Heiskell as, the “love of my life.” They would come to Fisher, W.Va. and raise their family.

Heiskell operated his own masonry business for 35 years and worked for Pilgrim’s Pride before he would retire to operate his own poultry farm.

Heiskell and Betty would have three children, Donna Lynn Kile, Lesley Ray Smith, and Jerry Smith.

Betty worked at American Woodmark for 22 years. She ran the paint machine and retired when she was 64. She stated that the concrete fl oor was killing her legs and feet.

ROYALTY - Union High School’s homecoming king and queen, Shoan Gordon and Victoria Seabolt. The pair were crowned during last week’s Tiger basketball game against Paw Paw. Ultimately the Tigers fell to the Pirates, 57-42.

Principal Megan DiBenedetto has released the names of those Maysville Elementary School students who have achieved honor roll status for the second nine weeks of the 2022-23 school year.

A HONOR ROLL

Third Grade

Viola Bradford, Kyler Evans, Maggie Evans, Jase Kuh, Klara Lambert, Aubree Marter, Aaralyn Martin, Paxton Miller, Josdiah Morrell, Jemma Poore, Madaline Rohrbaugh, Abigail Shirk, Rachel Shreve, Paxton Traub and Sawyer Welch.

Fourth Grade

Alexa Conrad, Lonnie Cook, William Cook, Ben Dailey, Emma Dye, Jace Evans, Zoey Evans, Faith Funk, Kaylee Goldizen, Lilly Hawk, Ezra Hesse, Karley Kessel, Adilyn Law, Ella Riggleman, Callie Roberts, Reese Rohrbaugh, Nadia Swick and John Luke Watts.

Fifth Grade

Jayla Bierkamp, Seneca Boddy, Cambrie Cole, Ally Hagerty, Braxton Heavener, Aubrey Kessel, Logan Nellis, Chase Pletcher, Remington Rohrbaugh, Noah Rumfelt and Tyler Sites.

Sixth Grade

Isabella Barger, Mason Evans, Owen Evans, Gabrielle Goldizen, Tenley Hedrick, Elizabeth Huffman, Lane Kuh, Gage Pennington, Shayla Rohrbaugh, Clarissa Roth, Shelby Runion, Addison Traub and Reagan Welch.

B HONOR ROLL

Fourth Grade

Gracelyn Crocker.

Fifth Grade

Jennifer Ludwig, Anniston Ours, Rezmai Stanley and Gregory Takacs.

Sixth Grade

Shaylon Clark, Kason Hall and Haley Simmons.

 

Petersburg Volunteer Fire Company 400 officers for 2023 are (front) Jeremy Hottinger - secretary, Dakota Ketterman - vice president, Jeremiah Mayle - president, Bobby Funk - chief; Hunter Whetzel - deputy chief, Dalton Ours - assistant chief, and (back) Kristy Rohrbaugh - treasurer, Kendon Sutherland - second captain, Charles Cook - first captain, Rodney Hedrick - trustee, Bowdie Hinkle - trustee, Dillon Lantz - sergeant, Ashton Barr - trustee and Marshall Collins - first lieutenant.

The Petersburg Volunteer Fire Company 400 held their annual banquet and installation of officers Jan. 7, at the fire hall.

Along with the installation service, several members were given special recognition.

• Royce Heare Memorial Award - Bobby Funk

• Firefighter of the Year - Clifton Ours

• Chief’s Award - BJ Bobby

• Line Officer of the Year - Kendon Sutherland

• President’s Award - Rodney Hedrick.

• Social Member of the Year - Susan Hedrick

• Distinguished Member - Marshall Collins. Last year, PVFC ran 410 calls, that being the most calls run in at least 5-10 years.

Company 400 thanks the community for all their generous donations including Grant Memorial Hospital, that allowed them to purchase a ladder truck and utility pickup in 2022.

They look forward to continued growth in the new year.

The West Virginia Board of Education (WVBE) approved a waiver to Policy 5202 to increase supports for students entering the teaching profession during its January meeting in Charleston.

The waiver will assist students with resources and structured support to pass the Praxis exam while they also gain important classroom teaching experience.

The WVBE and the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) have been working to increase the pipeline of teachers in the state through creative and innovative initiatives such as the Grow Your Own West Virginia Pathway to Teaching program.

This effort provides a pathway to teaching by removing barriers of cost and time for high school students interested in the profession.

Once in college, some students struggle to pass the Praxis II content exam(s) – a requirement to advance in their academic journey. Students usually take the exam after their sophomore year. Beginning immediately, the WVDE will offer fl exibilities to candidates meeting specific requirements including:

The West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (WVHEPC) announce the 2023 team match-ups for the West Virginia Academic Showdown.

Heading into its second year, 71 teams from 40 high schools representing 26 counties are scheduled to participate.

The Showdown is an academic head-to-head competition testing students’ knowledge in subject areas including math, history, sports, fine arts and more.

College partners will host regional competitions throughout the months of January and February. The double elimination Showdown features questions from the National Academic Quiz Tournament.

The top two teams from each region will advance to the finale at the West Virginia Culture Center in Charleston on March 31.

Students in grades 9-12 may participate, and schools may enter up to two teams to compete. The field of competitors has grown this year with 51 additional teams enrolled over last year.

Specific campus locations have been named for each regional event.

Shepherd University Regional — Saturday, Jan. 21, 9 a.m.

 

Current two-term West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner announced that he will be a Republican Party candidate for Governor of West Virginia in 2024.

A sixth-generation West Virginian, Warner is a veteran of the United States Army where he served 23 years and retired at the rank of Lt. Colonel.

He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and the WVU College of Law. He was first elected WV Secretary of State in 2016 and then overwhelmingly re-elected in 2020.

During the announcement Warner was accompanied by his wife of 40 years, Debbie Law Warner, who also serves as a member of the West Virginia legislature.

The Warners are the parents of four children - two sons and two daughters - who all are currently or have been officers in the United States military.

West Virginia University at Parkersburg announces its dean’s scholars for the fall 2022 semester.

Students named to the Dean’s List maintained a 3.5 grade point average while earning six or more hours of college credit.

The scholars include Wesley Cosner and Crystal Kuykendall, Petersburg.

Alderson Broaddus University has released the names of students earning academic distinction from the 2022 fall semester. Dr. Andrea J. Bucklew, Alderson Broaddus University’s provost, has released the dean’s and Honor list to recognize students for their academic achievements.

Full-time students who earned a 3.60 grade point average or above are named to the dean’s list.

Earning a place on the dean’s list is Jacob Perez of Maysville.

Grant County Arts Council, Inc. is calling on area residents of all ages to put pen to paper, paint to canvas, words to songs, or use other creative means to document their experiences and responses to the coronavirus pandemic.

Suggested themes might be eyes (since you had the lower portion of your face covered and eyes became the focus), shelter, or emerging. These are just suggestions, and you are welcome to discover your own best theme.

GCAC is now collecting stories (1,000 words or less), poems and song lyrics electronically.

Inquiries about formatting and any submissions should be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Art in any visual medium will be included in the annual Local Artists’ Visual Artists Exhibit, usually held in late winter.

You may consider painting, pen and ink drawings, stained glass, sculpture, textile art such as quilts, cross-stitch, samplers, and others that suit your thoughts and feelings.

Information at: 304-257-4891.

Anna Rexrode of Petersburg, was named to the 2022 fall semester dean’s list at Bridgewater College.

Rexrode is a health and exercise science major at Bridgewater.

She was among nearly 550 students named to the dean’s list, which was announced by Provost and Executive Vice President Dr. Leona A. Sevick.

Students on the dean’s list have attained a 3.4 or better grade point average.

The Seneca Rocks Discovery Center appeared before the Grant County Board of Education last week to extend an invitation to the county’s fourth grade students to participate in an experience aimed at strengthening their connection with the outdoors.

Jeremiah Hislip, the center’s director, explained that they had been working on the program with Pendleton County and were now inviting Grant County students to participate as well.

“We have been working to plan something that we believe will be a meaningful, worthwhile experience for fourth graders,” Hislip said. “...This would be a hands-on experience where they could visit the center and focus on outdoor recreation and heritage.”

Hislip said the program would open the center up to the students, offering them educational outdoor activities. He explained the trip, which could be open to all fourth graders in the county, could be done as either a day trip or an overnight experience.

“For an example scenario, the students would come on a Tuesday evening, take a short hike with the rangers to stretch their legs, come inside for a meal, watch a movie in the auditorium, then have a lesson with our astronomy or star program, learning about constellations,” Hislip said. “The next morning they would have breakfast and that’s when the real adventure would start. We would have educational stations, for example at the historic Sites Homestead, have an educator in period dress give them a tour of the homestead. They could work hands-on in the garden, getting to touch dirt and connect a little more with their food and where it comes from. We also have a program where we take the kids river snorkeling, where they get into the river and look at aquatic insects and learn about water ecology.”

Editor - Camille Howard;
News Editor - Erin Camp;
Advertising Manager - Tara Warner Pratt; 
Print Shop Manager - Richard Knight; 
Bookkeeping - Peggy Hughes;
Circulation - Mary Simmons

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